Daily struggle to take antiretrovirals: a qualitative study in Papuans living with HIV and their healthcare providers


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Sianturi EI, Latifah E, Probandari A, et al. Daily struggle to take antiretrovirals: a qualitative study in Papuans living with HIV and their healthcare providers. BMJ Open 2020;10:e036832. doi:10.1136/ bmjopen-2020-036832

ABSTRAK

Objective The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of Papuans living with HIV to take antiretroviral therapy (ART) from the patient and the healthcare providers (HCPs) perspective. Design This was a qualitative study covering all five tribes located in Papua Provinces one of two Indonesian provinces on Papua Island. Semistructured interviews were conducted with Papuans living with HIV and their HCPs. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded to find themes. Results Overall, we conducted interviews with 13 Papuans living with HIV (mean age: 33 years, 61% female) and 14 HCPs (mean age: 42 years, 64% female) within five customary areas. HCPs included three physicians, nine nurses, two others. Two main themes were identified: (1) personal factors and (2) healthcare environment-related factors. Personal factors were beliefs and knowledge of ART, stigma from family, community and HCPs as well as practical problems such as transportation because of long distance. Within the theme of healthcare environment, the competences and attitudes of HCPs were particularly relevant. The findings are important in refining HIV treatment strategies implemented in Papua, especially when extending HIV care provided by community centres. Conclusions Despite free access to ART, Papuans living with HIV struggle to remain on treatment. Considering local culture and religion in strategies to reduce stigma should be a priority